Select Category:

How to Write a Block Method Essay

How to Write a Block Method Essay | Outline, Point By Point Format

Admin

Written By

The block method of essay writing helps students understand how to organize their thoughts and write coherently. Rather than starting with the most difficult part of an essay, students are encouraged to begin with easy tasks and work up to the more complex ones.

This way, students understand how each section builds on the one before it and prevents any confusion about what comes next in their essay. Here’s how to write a block method essay from start to finish.

What are Block Method Essays?

Sometimes known as cause and effect essays argumentative essays or topic sentences block method essays are good for conveying facts exploring one’s opinions or presenting the information. They help writers organize their thoughts and determine what they will say within an allotted amount of time.

Typically, these essays begin with an introductory paragraph that contains the writer’s thesis statement it is followed by several paragraphs in which he states his point of view about that subject.

If you want to know how to write a block method essay, then check out our informative guide on how you can do just that.

Block Method Essay Prompts

The first part of any high school writing assignment is figuring out what your teacher wants you to do. Because each teacher has her style you must look at your assignment sheet or email and know what kind of paper you’re supposed to write. For example, most teachers require that students use MLA format when they cite their sources but some may give you a choice between APA and MLA.

This method works well because it gives you an easy way to divide up your essay into sections and provides a natural flow from one idea to another.

The purpose of a persuasive essay is to convince someone to agree with your point of view on an issue. To be successful you’ll need three things.

Organize your ideas into 5 sentences

1 – Write the Introduction sentence.

The introduction of an essay is, without doubt, its most important part. Here is where you will immediately gain your reader’s attention, and also where you provide them with a rough idea of what their reading experience will be like. It is therefore not surprising that many beginning writers tend to spend too much time on these first few sentences or even worse fail to complete them.

Write at least three paragraphs for each body paragraph. The average length of an introductory paragraph can vary from 150 words for example in some types of essays up to around 250 words in other cases. Keep in mind that each body paragraph should be at least 50-100 words long so that they are easier for your readers to follow. Make sure to introduce a topic sentence for each paragraph. This sentence needs to clearly state what your main point will be in that particular paragraph.

This statement would then become your topic sentence for one of your body paragraphs. Do not forget about thesis statements. A thesis statement tells us what we are going to talk about in our essay as well as gives us a clue about how we intend to approach it.

2 – Write the Transition Sentence.

The transition sentence is a no-brainer: It’s going to tell your reader what you’re going to be talking about in your main body of text. The transition sentence will do two things it’ll repeat some variation of your main idea in that final introductory sentence and it’ll provide some sense of cohesion by connecting back to that opening paragraph.

To start with asking yourself How does my second paragraph relate to my first or What can I say about my topic that will add insight into what I’m about to say Then put those two thoughts together and plug them into one transition sentence. Write Your Main Body The meat of your post should follow your transition sentence but how much meat is up to you.

In other words, take a look at your transition sentence and see if there are any holes in your logic or if you have any unanswered questions then fill them in before moving on. Sometimes just asking for feedback on your content can go a long way toward helping people get involved.

3 – Write three supporting paragraphs.

The first paragraph should summarize your primary point. The second paragraph should expand on that idea, providing an example from your own life or someone else’s experience that you’ve read about or heard about recently. The third paragraph needs to connect back to your primary point and explain how what you just talked about proves your argument.

For instance, maybe you talked about why it’s important for teachers not to give up on their students in which case you could also share a story of how one student succeeded despite being given up on by teachers in past years. This is all done in support of your primary thesis statement.

In other words, each paragraph is like a piece of evidence supporting your main idea and they are presented in order so that each new piece builds off of what came before it. Your conclusion should restate your thesis statement at least once and then use transition words to indicate.

4 – Integrate your evidence carefully.

Make sure your evidence is relevant and substantial Use appropriate transition words and phrases such as for example instance, in addition, moreover, nevertheless, finally, and of course. Avoid wordy transitions that can weaken your argument some writers use however when then would be just as effective or less wordy. Also, avoid repetitive transitions and try not to repeat a word or phrase more than once within three sentences.

Quote only what you need but make sure it’s exactly what you need by checking several sources before making any final decisions about how much text to include in quotation marks.

5 – How do you properly quote.

Quoting is an essential part of writing for any purpose, but it’s especially important if you’re presenting information that someone else discovered or created. Quotes give credit where credit is due and they also make your writing more interesting by showing how sources agree or disagree with each other or how they are feeling.

The most common way to quote in academic writing is by using either the MLA or APA system. If you choose to use one of these styles, you should know that there are certain rules on how you should properly quote your sources.

Here are five things you need to know about how to properly quote. When people talk about quoting they usually mean taking words directly from another source and putting them into your work without adding anything new or changing anything.

6 – Close with The Conclusion sentence.

You should now have your rough draft finished. Go back through it and look for spelling errors punctuation issues or any other mistakes that you need to fix. Now is also a good time to read over your work for flow and sentence structure as well.

Once you are happy with how it looks start looking at places where you can break up long sentences into shorter ones by using commas semicolons or periods instead of just relying on conjunctions. You can also consider switching up word choices in your sentences to make things sound more natural. Finally, proofread one last time and share it with someone whose opinion you trust.

It’s always good to get another set of eyes on something before you publish it. That way if there are any problems they can be fixed before going live. This step is especially important if you’re planning on publishing your post somewhere like LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. These networks will only allow you to edit posts within a certain period after publishing them so waiting until after proofreading will give you plenty of time to do so.

Conclusion

The block method of essay writing is helpful for anyone who has trouble crafting cohesive and well-developed paragraphs. It’s also useful for students who tend to get distracted by all of their ideas keeping them from getting down to writing.

Once you learn how to write a block method essay it’s easier than ever to tackle all kinds of papers whether they’re papers on college application tips or just papers on Labradoodles. Practice using your new format on any subject and you’ll be amazed at how easy it is to craft an organized and effective paper You might even win some points with your teacher. Who knows? He or she may want to know where you learned such a great strategy.

All examples were created using Microsoft Word 2013 Mac version but can easily be modified for other versions. Have fun Remember: The secret of good writing is to strip every sentence to its cleanest components. That’s what we’re doing here stripping our sentences down so that we have nothing left but core concepts, actions, etc.

Table of Contents

Who We Are?

We are U.S.-based, native English professional writers. We hold graduate and professional degrees from major universities (Princeton, Stanford, UCLA,Georgetown, Dartmouth, Penn, Northwestern). This is all that we do. We are accountable to our clients, and are proud to serve their needs on a “return customer”basis.

OUR GUARANTEE

  • 100% ORIGINAL work.
  • ZERO plagiarism.
  • You OWN the writing.
  • We do not store, archive, or recycle your paper. Period.
  • We meet YOUR DEADLINE.

If you’re after an “A”, you want the best. You want us.

Are You Still Confused?
Just relax because we take your paper seriously.

SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER! SPECIAL OFFER!

Get 50% OFF on All Your Orders Limited Time Deal