How to Write a Book Review For High School To University (Start-End)

book review describes, analyzes, and evaluates. The review conveys an opinion, supporting it with evidence from the book. If you are looking for the best books to use in your classroom or just want to find something interesting, check out our book reviews curated by college professors. To write a book review, first, consider what types of things you will need to include in your review. A book review may be written about a specific book or it may be an overview of several books. The main purpose of writing a book review is to convince other people to read the book being reviewed as well as provide information about its content and quality to help readers decide whether to read it or not. You can use this step as an outline when writing your book review later on.

HOW TO WRITE A BOOK REVIEW: 6 STEPS TO TAKE

  1. BEGIN WITH A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE BOOK

This is not an essay, so you don’t need to spend time writing an in-depth analysis. Instead, just tell readers what you thought of it the good and bad points.

There are several ways you can do that: 

  • First, start with an opening line that sums up your thoughts on how it was written.
  • Second, make comparisons with other works of literature.
  • Third, reflect on whether or not you would recommend it.
  • All three provide insight into how well-written the book is and your opinion on how much people should read it.
  1. PICK OUT THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF THE BOOK

If you’re writing a book review for your college English class or for any other reason, you may be tempted to focus on minor plot points or insignificant details. Instead, pick out one or two of the most important aspects of what you’ve read and write about those. A book review should act as an endorsement. it should convince readers that they can benefit from reading what you’ve read. When writing about fiction, for example, discuss why it made you feel something rather than just describing each plot point.

  1. INCLUDE BRIEF QUOTES AS EXAMPLES

This will give your post more credibility. Don’t go overboard with quotes. If you use more than two, you’re probably overdoing it. This isn’t Shakespeare we’re talking about here! You can find book reviews online and see what types of quotes they use to get a better idea of how much is too much. As long as your review is genuine, then anything goes.

  1. WRITE A CONCLUSION THAT SUMMARISES EVERYTHING

A book review doesn’t have to belong. It can be as short as you want it to be if that’s what you want. Your review doesn’t need a formal introduction either and you don’t have to provide any context for why you felt like reading a said book at that time. So, just write whatever it is that comes naturally and be genuine about it because no one else is going to read your review but you so make sure it’s something you can stand behind wholeheartedly without feeling like someone’s going to hold something against you later on down the line.

  1. FIND SIMILAR BOOKS

First off, it’s not easy. Anyone who says that writing is easy must have been asleep in English class their entire life. Writing is something that’s learned with practice, even if you’re just practicing how to make your sentences clearer or how to introduce your characters more effectively. You’ll mess up here and there while learning how to write, but that’s okay. Once you’ve made your mistakes then you can start implementing what you’ve learned and see great success as an author.

  1. GIVE IT A STAR RATING

A star rating is an easy way for you to tell your readers how good your book is. It helps them understand what they’re getting into before deciding whether or not they want to spend their time on it. If you have any friends who have already written reviews, ask if they can help you determine which criteria they used when rating it. Your opinion of the book may vary from your friend’s, but try to get as close as possible with their system so that you can translate your answer into something similar when creating your review system.

How To Read a Book?

There are plenty of ways to write a book review. At its most basic, writing a book review is an excellent way for students, librarians, and others who love books to think about what they read and how others might respond. It is also an excellent way for readers to find new books that might interest them. If you’re wondering how to write a book review then keep reading. Here we have some tips on how to write a book review, how to get started, and where to go from there. We’ll even show you how easy it can be by providing some examples of reviews already written by our members.

For many people in higher education, writing book reviews is part of their job description. Professors often assign reviews as class projects or ask students to prepare reviews as homework assignments. Students may be required or simply encouraged to publish their work in school-sponsored journals or online sites such as Amazon’s Vine program.

How To Summarize the Story in Your Review?

Before you get started, understand that writing a book review isn’t going to be easy. Instead of summarizing, take some time and formulate your ideas and opinions about what you read. Whether it’s fiction or nonfiction, you must cover all of these steps when writing your review: Write down notes while reading. Writing down comments on key aspects will be extremely helpful later on. There are many things that authors typically include in their books and also there are certain topics they focus on or underline (informally). Write them down as they appear because they will come in handy while writing your review.

How To Quote from The Story in Your Review

You can quote from different parts of the story and write your review based on these quotes, but don’t forget to include what you liked or disliked about each part. If you do choose to quote directly, keep in mind that any long passages must be put in quotation marks. You should also put a citation immediately after including an excerpt so readers know where it is from. This will make it easier for them to look up and read that part of your book later if they want to see what else you found particularly powerful or meaningful.

Tips to start writing your review

As with many things, knowing how to write book reviews can be mastered by breaking it down into smaller pieces. Following are some tips you can use as you learn how to write book reviews.

  • Keep it Streamlined:

When writing your book review, don’t get caught up in background information. Stick to details that are relevant to your overall opinion of the book, and avoid repetition. Provide insight into what you enjoyed or disliked about each book in addition to details about characters, plot, and whether or not you recommend it to other readers. If you didn’t care for a particular piece of literature, explain why you couldn’t relate to or enjoy it by providing specific examples from the story itself. These techniques will help keep your book review streamlined and interesting instead of redundant and boring.

  • Remember to Proofread:

When writing your book review, be sure to read it through carefully and reread any long or unfamiliar words or phrases. Misspelled words and typos may make your writing seem unprofessional. Remember, you want your book review to help potential readers decide whether they’d like to buy and read that book. Your goal is not just for them to understand what you have written but also for them to enjoy reading it as well. Also, take a look at 10 Proofreading Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making. Correct any mistakes so that it is flawless before submitting them for publication.

  • Don’t Be Mean:

The biggest mistake book reviewers make is planning an author’s work unfairly. If you don’t like a book, review it anyway. State your grievances in clear terms that might even convince other people that they shouldn’t read it either. After all, as Stephen King once wrote: A book review, in essence, is one person telling another person why he or she should or shouldn’t read a particular book. The review may be favorable or unfavorable, but an essential element of its effectiveness is that it tells readers something about the nature of what they are about to encounter between covers. Write honest reviews and write them well and you could end up creating converts out of even your most vehement critics.

Conclusion

The book review is one of those writing assignments that are often dreaded by students. It doesn’t help that there are many different approaches you can take when it comes to reviewing a book, or that some teachers make it an absolute requirement. But if you want your audience to learn something from your review, be honest and straightforward with them. Give them five strong reasons why they should read your book. Explain how it will impact their lives for years after reading it. There’s no need for fluff; as long as you give solid advice on how others can benefit from reading; you’ll have done what was asked of you.