In the history of organized crime towards humanity, the name al-Qaeda and Osama Bin Laden come in being. In the fall of September 2002, America witnessed one of the most humane terrorist attacks against civilian orchestra by the terror group al-Qaeda. The chief master-mind was Osama Bin Laden who made it clear being responsible for the attack. The U.S government enlisted the al-Qaeda network as an outlawed group and Osama Bin Laden in the list of the most wanted in the world. On that account, come May 2011, the U.S government under the Special Forces military, Osama Bin Laden was killed in an operation dubbed ‘Operation Neptune Spear’. In actual sense, the circumstances that surrounded the death of Osama Bin Laden are not very clear yet, as there are different stories are revolving around his death.

Further over the period of time, Osama Bin Laden had been the list of the most sorted individual as his hunt begun soon after the September attack. The statement made by the then American President George Bush opened the strenuous hunt for Bin Laden not forgetting dismantling the entire al-Qaeda network. The tracking down of Bin Laden had well begun in the mid-1990s under a code unit ‘Alec Station’ which was afterward closed in the wake of 2005 under the backdrop of the CIA subversive mission to another alternative location.

The mission on Bin Laden and his nemesis was revamped back when President Obama was inaugurated into office. Remarkably, during President Obama campaign trail back in 2008, his proclamation that states: “We will Kill Bin Laden, We will crush al-Qaeda” was meted with great enthusiasm making it the priority on the national security front.

As a matter of fact, the Americans’ intelligence fraternity mission to locate Osama Bin Laden emanated from the bits and pieces from the information retrieved from the infamous attack of 2002, culminating into years of consistent investigation. More precisely, the wake of July 2010 marked the turning point instigated by a Pakistanis working for the Intelligence Agency who put down the Bin Laden’s car license plate. This information gave the C.I.A  a leeway on tracking Bin Laden in an around central Pakistan ultimately to a sprawling compound in Abbottabad.

The pinnacle of this whole mission was the Abbottabad operation and by the beginning of September 2010, the military had been dispatched to Abbottabad launching surveillances intensively. In cognizance of the operation Neptune Spear, the theme was “a kill-or-capture” mission with the connotation of “kill” of great emphasis as it was clear right from the beginning that Bin Laden would not surrender. The fact that the operation was under the military meant that a lot of information was highly confidential.

As it turned out, the arrival of a group of twenty-five Navy Seals with two Black Hawk helicopter on the wake of May 2011 saw the assault of Bin Laden compound in Abbottabad. Remarkably, the operation lasted about forty minutes as the Special Forces had breached the exterior walls of the compound before making their way through the ground floor where Bin Laden lived.

What ensued thereafter were firefights and the last ten minutes of the episode, Bin Laden succumbs to the gunshot wound on the head. Among the casualties were three men and a woman including Bin Laden son. Incidentally, there were no any American casualties in the assault. Osama Bin Laden’s body was airlifted to Afghanistan for official verification to be later buried in an unidentified location in the Arabian Sea in accordance with the Islamic doctrines.